Monday, November 20, 2017

the same deep water as you

1 1/2 oz Plantation Dark Rum
1/2 oz Del Maguey Mezcal Vida
3/4 oz Tamarind-Cinnamon Syrup (*)
3/4 oz Lime Juice
1 dash Angostura Bitters

Shake with ice, strain into a Collins glass, fill with crushed ice, add a straw, and garnish with a mint sprig (later, it was a mint sprig + a paper umbrella).
(*) In a pinch, substitute 3/4 oz cinnamon syrup and 1 tsp tamarind concentrate such as Tamicon from an Indian spice store, otherwise follow the directions below.
(*) To make this syrup, break up 4 cinnamon sticks and add to 10 oz water in a pot. Bring to a boil and simmer covered 10 minutes. Add 10 oz sugar and 4 oz tamarind concentrate, stir while bringing back to a boil, cover, turn off heat, and let steep for 2 hours or more before straining.
In thinking about other ingredients to bring to the Cocktail Lab at Earl's Prudential two Mondays ago, I thought about tamarind syrup and recalled how well it paired with rum, cinnamon, and lime in the Final Countdown. Veering from that drink's Jet Pilot format, I dropped the grapefruit juice to make it more of a Test Pilot in structure and brought in a smoky mezcal akin to the Mr. Howell Daiquiri utilizing Scotch. I took the drink in a Tiki direction by serving it over pellet ice with a mint sprig (and later a paper umbrella) as garnish, and I kept with The Cure's Disintegration theme by dubbing this one The Same Deep Water as You.

Sunday, November 19, 2017

prayers for rain

2 oz Espolon Blanco Tequila
1/2 oz Cantaloupe Syrup (*)
1/2 oz Lime Juice
1/4 oz Galliano L'Autentico
1 dash Regan's Bitters

Shake with ice, strain into a rocks glass (or cocktail coupe), and garnish with an oregano sprig (here, clipped onto the glass with a slitted lemon twist).
(*) Cubed cantaloupe melon blended and fine strained. This juice was mixed with an equal part of sugar and stirred until dissolved. I avoided heat to retain more aroma and to not give the melon a cooked flavor.
Two Mondays ago for my second shift at the Cocktail Lab located in Earl's Prudential, I decided to do an uniting theme of drinks named after song titles from The Cure's Disintegration album. For the first of the trio that I dubbed Prayers for Rain, I was inspired by the cantaloupes that I had been buying at my local market, and it reminded me of a Day of the Dead cantaloupe drink that I had tried years ago called the Marigold Ofrenda. I thought of this drink as a re-envisioned Margarita and returned some orange notes to the mix via Regan's bitters. However, the combination needed some pizazz so I added a touch of Galliano to donate complementary vanilla and star anise notes to the mix. For a garnish, my oregano patch in my garden had been doing rather well and it seemed like a perfect Mexican-appropriate touch to the drink.

Saturday, November 18, 2017

leap frog

2 oz Plymouth Gin (Damrak)
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Rothman & Winter Apricot Liqueur
1/4 oz Simple Syrup
2 dash Orange Bitters (Regan's)
6 leaf Mint

Muddle mint in simple syrup, add rest of the ingredients, shake with ice, and strain into a cocktail coupe glass.

Two Saturdays ago, I grabbed the PDT Cocktail Book off of the shelf and stumbled upon the Leap Frog. Jim Meehan created this drink as a riff on the Leaping Frog from Tom Bullock's 1917 The Ideal Bartender; his starting point was a recipe that was a shaken concoction of Hungarian apricot eau de vie and lime juice. The same drink idea appeared in the 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book as the Hop Toad with lemon instead of lime. Here, it appears that Meehan was inspired by perhaps a combination of the Pendennis and Southside to make the original recipe more palatable.
The Leap Frog offered up an apricot and mint aroma that led into a lemon sip with a hint of orchard fruit. Next, the swallow gave forth gin and apricot flavors with a mint finish.

Friday, November 17, 2017

weirding way

1 oz Boomsma Oude Genever (Rutte Old Simon)
1 oz Batavia Arrack (Van Oosten)
1 1/2 oz Strong Black Tea (English Breakfast)
1 oz Lemon Juice
3/4 oz 2:1 Honey Syrup (1 oz 1:1)
3 dash Bittermens Boston Bittahs (Burlesque Bitters)

Shake with ice, strain into a Collins glass with ice, and garnish with a lemon wheel (lemon twist studded with 3 cloves).

On Friday night two weeks ago, I selected a few volumes of The Cocktail Hour series and found an intriguing gem in the gin booklet. The recipe was the Weirding Way crafted by Ricky Gomez when he was at the Tear Drop Lounge in Portland, and it included the description of, "gently spiced, with layers of trade routes in a glass." The drink name is a Dune reference describing a form of movement training useful in close quarters fighting, and the drink itself had elements of a classic punch to it.
Weirding Way gave forth a lemon, malt, and clove bouquet to the nose. Next, lemon, honey, and malt on the sip transitioned to Batavia Arrack's funk, Genever's malt and botanicals, and black tea flavors. True to a punch, the flavors were rather balanced here.

Thursday, November 16, 2017

disappearing act

1 oz Lillet Blanc (Cocchi Americano)
1/2 oz Linie Aquavit (Aalborg)
1/2 oz Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Simple Syrup
1 tsp Giffard Peche Liqueur (1/4 oz Briottet Crème de Peche de Vigne)

Shake with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, top with sparkling wine (1 1/2 oz Ninety+ Cellars Prosecco), and garnish with a lemon twist.
Two Thursdays ago, I was flipping through the pages of Amanda Schuster's New York Cocktails when I spotted a recipe called the Disappearing Act that reminded me of the one that Paul Clarke crafted for a Mixology Monday event in 2012 with the same name. In essence, this Disappearing Act created by Manhattan's Nitecap bar was an aquavit for gin (or brandy) French 75 with Lillet and peach notes as accents. Once prepared, the drink offered a lemon-floral bouquet to the nose. Next, a carbonated lemon and white wine sip led into caraway, citrus peel, and peach notes on the swallow.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

harbor

2/3 Calvados (2 oz Boulard VSOP)
1 dash Apricot Brandy (1/2 oz Rothman & Winter Liqueur)
3 dash Lime Juice (1/2 oz)
1 dash Orange Bitters (Regan's)

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass.
Two Wednesdays ago, I turned to Pioneers of Mixing at Elite Bars: 1903-1933 for my evening's refreshment. There, I spotted the Harbor that reminded me of the Sonora and Tulip with their apple brandy, apricot liqueur, and citrus components. Once prepared, the Harbor shared an apple aroma with hints of apricot. Next, lime mingled with orchard fruit notes on the sip, and the swallow combined the apple and apricot into an almost novel flavor followed by a tart lime finish.

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

mutiny of clowns

3/4 oz Cruzan Blackstrap Rum
3/4 oz Cynar
3/4 oz Lime Juice
1/2 oz Ginger Syrup
1/4 oz Demerara Syrup

Shake with ice, strain into a rocks glass (cocktail coupe), and garnish with an orange peel "cup" peel side down, filled with 151 proof rum (El Dorado), and ignited.
On October 31st, I was flipping through my new book purchases and discovered that there was a small section of Halloween-themed recipes in Amanda Schuster's New York Cocktails book. The one that seemed most appropriate to crown the holiday was the Mutiny of Clowns by David Nurmi of the now closed Jakewalk. Once built and after the rum burned itself out, the Mutiny of Clowns provided an orange oil bouquet over dark blackstrap rum and Cynar aromas and sharp lime notes. Next, the lime matched the rum and amaro's caramel on the sip, and the swallow offered dark rum and vegetal funk flavors with a ginger finish that helped to tie the drink together.

Monday, November 13, 2017

mojito from ipanema

2 oz Leblon Cachaça
1/2 oz Lime Juice
1/2 oz Simple Syrup
2 medium Nasturtium Leaves (sliced into 6ths)
1 Nasturtium Flower

Shake with ice, double strain into a Collins glass with 3 oz soda water, fill with ice, add a straw, and garnish with a fresh nasturtium leaf and flower.
Two Mondays ago, I began my Monday night residency at the Cocktail Lab at Earl's Prudential with a three drink menu. The theme tying the trio together were herbs and fruit that either I grew in my garden or were foraged within a half mile of my home. As for the foraged aspect, I had already described the Crabapple Fight! (now with a photo from the event) that utilized three types of crabapples from the Davis Square bike path, and the second drink utilized my garden's sage by way of the Oaxacan Smash that I came up with over the summer. The third menu item featured nasturtiums that are in full bloom right now on the fringes of the garden. I was originally considering pairing this with a rum, but when I learned that nasturtiums are from Peru, I decided to go with cachaça to maintain a South American theme. For a format, I decided that a Mojito would be recognizable enough to lure people into drink cachaça. Overall, the peppery notes from the nasturtiums worked rather well with the grassy funky flavors of the Brazilian spirit, and the presentation with the bright flower and lily pad-like leaf did not hurt either.

Sunday, November 12, 2017

malecon

1 3/4 oz White Rum (Denizen)
1 oz Lime Juice
1/2 oz Ruby Port (Sandeman Tawny)
2 tsp Oloroso Sherry (Lustau)
2 tsp Sugar (Cane Crystals)
3 dash Peychaud's Bitters

Shake with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, and garnish with an ice cube. Note: I dissolved the sugar in the lime juice first.

To cap off Sunday two weeks ago, I reached for Paul Clarke's The Cocktail Chronicles where I came across the Malecon. I immediately recognized that name from Thad Volger's By the Smoke and the Smell where he documented his trip to Cuba to learn about its rum production. Here, the drink was crafted by Erik Lorincz at the American Bar at London's Savoy Hotel, and it was indeed named after Havana's waterfront promenade.
The grape from the Malecon's port was brightened by lime notes on the nose. Next, the lime and grape intermingled on the sip, and the swallow paired the rum with nutty sherry that led to an anise-herbal finish.

Saturday, November 11, 2017

legendre mint julep

1 Tbsp Water (1/2 oz)
1 tsp Bar Sugar (2 Demerara Sugar Cubes)
3-4 sprig Mint
1 oz Bourbon (2 oz Fighting Cock 103)
2 dash Jamaican Rum (1/4 oz Smith & Cross)
1 dash Herbsaint (1/8+ oz)

Muddle mint with sugar and water (I dissolved the sugar before adding the mint to muddle). Add the rest of the ingredients, remove the muddled mint, and fill with crushed ice. Garnish with fresh mint sprigs and fruit (omit fresh fruit).
Two Saturdays ago, my search for that evening's drink led me to Trader Vic's 1972 Bartender's Guide. In the Julep section, I was lured in by the Legendre Mint Julep named after J. Marion Legendre who helped to create the absinthe-substitute Herbsaint in New Orleans circa 1934 after learning how to make absinthe while in France during World War I. Besides the Herbsaint, the Julep contained the classic trio of Bourbon, mint, and sugar along with a dash of Jamaican rum which I often include in my Mint Juleps and Smashes. Once prepared, the Legendre Mint Julep shared a glorious mint bouquet to the nose. Next, a malt sip proffered a hint of vegetalness, and the swallow accented the Bourbon with a touch of rum funk and ended with a mint and anise finish. Indeed, the Herbsaint complemented the mint notes as they have in the Pliny the Elder and Pontarlier Julep.

punsch ghoul bowle

1 1/2 oz Appleton Estate Rum
1/4 oz Smith & Cross Rum
1/2 oz Batavia Arrack
1/2 oz Orange Juice
1/2 oz Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Tempus Fugit Crème de Cacao
1/4 oz Demerara Syrup

Shake with ice, strain into a Collins glass, fill with crushed ice, add a straw, and float 1/2 oz of house red wine. Normally, the outer vessel would contain dry ice in a water bath to garnish the drink with fog, but their supplier was out of dry ice that day.

For my second drink at Backbar, I asked bartender Amanda Greenfield for the Punsch Ghoul Bowle which was the Halloween-themed drink of the week. The drink was crafted by Kat Lamper and was subtitled, "A Halloween treat for grownups inspired by a punch bowl cocktail popular in 1900." When I inquired as to which drink it was based off of, I was shown David Wondrich's Punch book that was open to the section on Punschglühbowle; that recipe consisted of two parts light red wine to one part Batavia Arrack along with orange juice, lemon juice, and sugar that was served both heated and flaming. Here, the drink was more spirit driven with the addition of Jamaican rums and flavored with chocolate liqueur.
The Punsch Ghoul Bowle began with a red wine aroma that gave way to a lemon and orange sip with a dark note from the crème de cacao. Next, the swallow showcased the funky rums and Arrack along with a complementary earthy note from the chocolate element. Over time, the red wine float entered the equation and appeared mostly in the sip.

Friday, November 10, 2017

pisco flower

1 1/4 oz Macchu Pisco
1/2 oz Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Tempus Fugit Crème de Violette
1/2 oz St. Germain
1/4 oz Simple Syurp
1 dash Peychaud's Bitters
1 Egg White

Shake once without ice and once with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, and garnish with an edible orchid.
Two Fridays ago, I needed to get out of the house so I walked over to Backbar. There, I found a seat in front of bartender Amanda Greenfield. For a first drink, I asked Amanda for the Pisco Flower that she attributed to Kat Lamper as her flowery take on a Pisco Sour. Once prepared, the Pisco Flower contributed a floral aroma from the orchid garnish and violet liqueur. Next, a creamy lemon sip led into pisco and a medley of floral flavors on the swallow.

Thursday, November 9, 2017

devonshire

Jigger 2/3 Sherry (2 1/4 oz Lustau Amontillado)
1 dash Cointreau (1/4 oz)
1/4 Maraschino (1/4 oz Luxardo)
1 dash Picon Bitters (1/4 oz Torani Amer)

Stir with ice and strain into a cocktail glass; I added an orange twist.

Two Thursdays ago, I ventured into Pioneers of Mixing at Elite Bars: 1903-1933 and uncovered the Devonshire in the wine chapter. Given the Maraschino in the recipe, I figured that a nutty, oxidized sherry like an Amontillado would work perfectly here. Moreover, the combination of Cointreau, Maraschino, and Picon was one that I have seen in old recipes such as the Mother-In-Law and White Rat and in newer ones like the Hoskins, so I was excited to give it a try here with sherry.
Once built, the Devonshire shared an orange aroma over nutty grape and Maraschino notes. Next, the grape continued on into the sip along with a hint of orange, and this was chased by nutty sherry and cherry flavors on the swallow with a bitter orange finish.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

gunwale punch

1/2 oz Lime Juice
1 oz Grapefruit Juice
1/2 oz Apricot Liqueur (Rothman & Winter)
1/2 oz Swedish Punsch (Kronan)
1 oz Rhum Agricole Blanc (Clement Premiere Canne)
1 oz Blanco Tequila (Cimarron)
10 drop Absinthe (St. George)

Shake with ice, strain into a Tiki mug, fill with crushed ice, and garnish with mint.

After the previous night's enjoyment of the Gun Club Punch #2, I decided to riff on the combination by switching the sweeteners from curaçao and rock candy syrup to apricot liqueur and Swedish punsch that had worked rather well in the Havana Cocktail. Moreover, I changed spirit base to a rhum agricole and tequila that impressed me in Martin Cate's Menehune Gonzalez. With the rum, grapefruit, and lime trio, I wanted to take a step closer to the Jet Pilot by adding back a small amount of spice through a dash of absinthe.
In the mug, the garnishes greeted the nose with a mint and peppery floral bouquet. Next, grapefruit and lime on the sip transitioned into the combination of grassy and vegetal spirits and the apricot-Swedish punsch duo on the swallow with a light anise finish. Overall, the presence of apricot in the mix reminded me of the Golden Gun to some degree.

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

gun club punch #2

Juice 1 Lime (1 oz)
1 1/2 oz Grapefruit Juice
1 dash Rock Candy Syrup (2 demerara sugar cubes dissolved in above citrus juice)
1 dash Curaçao (1/2 oz Van der Hum)
1 1/2 oz Light Puerto Rican Rum (Angostura White Oak)
1/2 oz 151 Proof Demerara Rum (El Dorado)

Blend with a scoop of ice, pour into a Big Shot mug, and fill with ice cubes (shake with ice, strain into a Tiki mug, and fill with crushed ice). Garnish with fresh mint and a fruit stick (mint sprigs and grapefruit swath).

Two Tuesdays ago, I was feeling in a tropical drink mood, so I selected Trader Vic's 1972 Bartender's Guide from the book shelf. There in the punch section was the second variation of the Gun Club Punch; I had made the first variation about two years ago. In the second variation, the juices went from lime and pineapple to lime and grapefruit and the sweeteners from grenadine and curaçao to rock candy syrup and curaçao; moreover, the partner of the light Puerto Rican rum switched from dark Jamaican to overproof Demerara. In both cases, I upped the sweeteners to better balance the lime juice's tartness.
The Gun Club Punch #2 gave forth a mint and grapefruit aroma from the garnishes. Next, lime and grapefruit mingled on the sip, and the swallow shared rum, orange, and vanilla notes. Overall, the rums, lime, and grapefruit reminded me of a Jet Pilot albeit in a more mellow format without all of the spice notes.

Monday, November 6, 2017

d.w.b.

2 oz La Favorite Rhum Agricole Blanc (Clement Premiere Canne)
1/2 oz Batavia Arrack Van Oosten
3/4 oz Lime Juice
1/2 oz 2:1 Cane Sugar Syrup

Shake with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, and garnish with a lime wedge (omit).
Two Mondays ago, I reached for the Death & Co. Cocktail Book and ended up in the Daiquiri variation section. There, Phil Ward's 2008-vintage D.W.B. or Daiquiri with Benefits seemed like a good way to cap off the evening. For a spirit base in an otherwise straightforward Daiquiri was the funky combination of rhum agricole and Batavia Arrack which I have only had paired together in the Sang et Sable. Once shaken and strained, the nose offered grassiness from the rhum agricole and a funk from both liquors that were brightened by the lime aroma. Next, the lime sang out on the sip, and the swallow was the intriguing transition of grassy flavors finishing with dry funk from the Batavia Arrack.

Sunday, November 5, 2017

the last waltz

1/2 oz Rye Whiskey (Rittenhouse)
1/4 oz Cherry Heering
1 tsp Yellow Chartreuse
1 dash Angostura Bitters
2 dash Bittermens Mole Bitters

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe with 2 oz sparkling wine (90+ Cellars Prosecco), and garnish with a lemon twist.
Two Sundays ago, I thumbed through the new issue of Imbibe Magazine and spotted the section of Holiday cocktails. There, I was drawn to the Last Waltz by Justin Powell and Bobbi Kay at Berlin's Pauly Saal. Once prepared, the Last Waltz donated a lemon and rye aroma to the nose. Next, sparkling wine and a dark fruit note from the Cherry Heering filled the sip, and the swallow offered rye, chocolate, cherry, and spice flavors that made Andrea comment that it was "like a lightly carbonated Manhattan."

Saturday, November 4, 2017

puhi

1 oz Añejo Tequila (Lunazul Reposado)
1 oz Lustau Oloroso Sherry
1 oz Amaro Ramazzotti
1 oz Cynar
2 dash Bittermens Molé Bitters

Stir with ice, strain into a rocks glass, and garnish with orange oil from a twist.
Two Saturdays ago, I was perusing the OnTheBar drink database when I spotted an interesting drink from Jenna Rycroft called the Puhi. Puhi is the Hawaiian word for eel, and it appeared part of her circa 2015 series at No. 9 Park that included the 'I'iwi Bird. Since the combination seemed like a good digestif and nightcap, I gave it a go. In the glass, the Puhi shared an orange aroma over nutty sherry and root beer notes. Next, the amari's caramel joined the sherry's grape on the sip, and the swallow displayed the great interplay of tequila and Cynar's vegetal flavors along with complementary coffee and chocolate notes from the other ingredients.

Friday, November 3, 2017

stone

1/2 jigger Sherry (1 1/2 oz Lustau Amontillado)
1/4 Sweet Vermouth (3/4 oz Cocchi)
1/4 Bacardi (3/4 oz Clement Premiere Canne Rhum Agricole Blanc)
1 dash Picon Bitters (1/4 oz Torani Amer)

Stir with ice and strain into a cocktail glass.
On Friday two weeks ago, I delved into wine chapter of Pioneers of Mixing at Elite Bars: 1903-1933 and spotted the Stone. I followed the book's recommendation to substitute a rhum agricole for the call of early Bacardi Rum, and I figured that Rhum Clement would offer a bit of intrigue here. Once prepared, the Stone gave forth a grassy and mineral nose from the rhum agricole that joined notes of nutty grape from the sherry. Next, grape fill the sip, and it continued on into the swallow where it mingled with grassy rum flavors and was chased by a nutty and bitter orange finish.

Thursday, November 2, 2017

sun and shadow

2 1/2 oz Dark Jamaican Rum (Coruba)
3/4 oz Light 151 Proof Rum (Don Q)
1/2 oz Apricot Brandy (Rothman & Winters)
2 oz Pineapple Juice
Juice 1/2 Lime (1/2 oz)

Shake with ice, strain into a 14 oz glass (Tiki mug), and fill with ice.

Two Thursdays ago, I searched through Trader Vic's 1972 Bartender's Guuide and spotted the Sun and Shadow. The name reminded me of Joe Scialom's 1957 Sol y Sombra; however, the Scialom's recipe as provided by Jeff Berry's Potions of the Caribbean had different rums and an addition of bitters. Therefore, the Trader Vic drink seemed perhaps distinct enough to make as a variation.
The Sun and Shadow presented a mint and peppery floral nose given my choice of mint sprigs and nasturtium blossom garnish. Next, lime, the dark rum's caramel, and a hint of pineapple on the sip transitioned into dark rum, overproof rum's heat, and apricot flavors modulated by pineapple on the swallow. Overall, it was not greatly different from the Sol y Sombra save for how the greater amount of dark rum and inclusion of overproof rum shifted the flavor balance away from the fruit notes to a darker and more boozy hot and dry drink.

sally can't surf

1 oz Espolon Tequila
3/4 oz Appleton Estate Rum
1/2 oz Orgeat
1/4 oz Aperol
2 dash Grapefruit Bitters
1 pinch Salt

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail glass, and garnish with a lemon twist.
On my way from Harvard Square before meeting Andrea for dinner at Trina's Starlite Lounge, I popped into Kirkland Tap & Trotter for a round. For a drink, I requested the Sally Can't Surf that slightly reminded me of a Japanese in concept. In the glass, the Sally Can't Surf gave forth a lemon aroma with a fruity note from the Aperol. Next, a creamy orange-tinted sip shared the aged rum's caramel notes, and the swallow began with tequila and nutty flavors and ended with a bitter grapefruit finish and a richness from the rum and orgeat.

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

les sablons

1 1/2 oz Absolut Elyx Vodka (Citadelle Gin)
1/2 oz Manzanilla Sherry
1/2 oz Benedictine
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
1/4 oz Simple Syrup

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass.

Two Wendnesdays ago, I met friends at Les Sablons in Harvard Square. For a drink, I went with the namesake cocktail that has been attributed to bar director Jackson Cannon who also put the drink on the menu at sister restaurant Eastern Standard. As I have done with drinks such as the Parisian Orchid and Beacon Fix, I asked if I could have the Les Sablons with gin; in keeping with the French theme, I requested Citadelle Gin which I had spotted elsewhere on the menu. With gin, the drink recipe read like a Barbara West with Benedictine in the mix.
The Les Sablons with gin greeted the senses with a lemon, savory, and juniper nose. Next, the lemon and savory notes continued into the sip, and the swallow provided complementary gin and herbal flavors with a clean sherry finish.

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

pan american clipper

1 jigger Applejack or Calvados (2 oz Copper & Kings Floodwall Apple Brandy)
1 scant pony Lime Juice (1/2 oz)
1 tsp Grenadine (1/2 oz)
1 dash Absinthe (1 bsp Copper & Kings Absinthe Blanche)

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass.

Two Tuesdays ago, the topic of Charles H. Baker, Jr.'s The Gentleman's Companion came up earlier in the day, and I decided to find that evening's refreshment from those pages. There, I spotted the Pan American Clipper that Baker attributed to be "from the notebook of one of our pilot friends who -- when off duty -- may seek one." The recipe seemed like the Cuban Aviacion with lime instead of lemon, a Jack Rose with absinthe, or a Shrunken Skull with apple brandy instead of rum. Since the Aviacion was published around the same time as the Pan American Clipper during the heyday of the flying boat, perhaps they stem from the same genesis with different names (especially considering that Cuban recipes were often vague as to whether limón meant lemon or lime).
The Pan American Clipper began with an apple and anise bouquet. Next, a dry lime joined a vague fruit note from the apple brandy or the pomegranate on the sip, and the swallow paired the apple with the pomegranate's berry flavor with an absinthe's anise finish.

wai wai

1 oz Hamilton's 86 Proof Guyana Rum
1 oz Oloroso Sherry
3/4 oz Giffard Banane du Bresil
1/4 oz Orgeat
3/4 oz Lime Juice
1 dash Angostura Bitters

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail coupe.
For my second drink at Estragon, I opted for Sahil Mehta's drink of the day from a week and a half ago that had more of a tropical slant. Given the Guyanese rum driving this drink, it got dubbed the Wai Wai after one of the nine indigenous tribes of Guyana. Once prepared, it shared a banana and nutty aroma to the nose. Next, grape and lime mingled on the sip before rum, banana, and nutty flavors rounded out the swallow.

Monday, October 30, 2017

skin & bones

1 oz Brennivin Aquavit
1 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth
3/4 oz Bonal Gentiane-Quinquina
1/4 oz Benedictine
2 dash Angostura Bitters
1 dash Peychaud's Bitters

Stir with ice, strain into a rocks glass (in Sahil's original Instagram photo, it was a cocktail glass), and garnish with a lemon twist.
Two Mondays ago, I decided to visit bartender Sahil Mehta at Estragon for dinner. For a first cocktail, I looked through Sahil's drink notebook and spotted his drink of the day from a month ago that seemed like an interesting use of Brennivin aquavit by pairing it with Bonal. For a name, it got dubbed the Skin & Bones after the Foo Fighters song that mentioned "Brennivin and cigarettes." Once in the glass, the Skin & Bones gave forth a lemon aroma with herbal hints to the nose. Next, a semi-dry red grape sip gave way to caraway and other herbal flavors on the swallow with a bitter spice finish. Moreover, I found the flavor balance came together more as the drink got a touch warmer.

Sunday, October 29, 2017

saigon special

1 pony Cognac (1 oz Courvoisier VS)
1/2 pony Dry Gin (1/2 oz Citadelle)
1/2 pony Cointreau (1/2 oz)
1/2 tsp Lemon Juice (1/4 oz)
2 tsp or so Egg White (1 Egg White)

Shake once without and once with ice, strain into a cocktail glass, and garnish with a cherry.

For the cocktail hour on Sunday night two weeks ago, I delved back into Charles H. Baker, Jr.'s The Gentleman's Companion: Jigger Beaker, and Glass. There, I was drawn to the Saigon Special that Baker discovered when his boat, the SS Resolute, stopped into South East Asia in 1925. Baker described how this recipe reminded him of the Jerusalem's Between the Sheets that he wrote about but with egg white and a bit sweeter in the balance. I ended up increasing the lemon juice to dry things out a bit though.
The Saigon Special provided a lemon and cherry nose with hints of orange and Cognac. Next, a creamy lemon and orange sip transitioned into a gin, orange, and brandy-filled swallow. Overall, the Saigon Special came across like a White Lady with brandy notes in the mix.

Saturday, October 28, 2017

crabapple fight!

I just bottled a syrup yesterday for my 5 Monday long residency at the Cocktail Lab at Earl's Prudential. Starting Monday October 30th and throughout November, I will be manning the first floor bar from 5-11pm. Stop on by to see what new trio of drinks I will be serving! The Crabapple Fight below the photo is one of them and will be part of a this week's forage/still growing in my garden theme.
Fred at the Cocktail Lab
Earl's Kitchen at the Prudential Center
800 Boylston St in Boston
Monday nights from 5-11pm October 30th, November 6th, 13th, 20th, 29th!
This drink was inspired by the crabapple jelly that I made for my wife Andrea this season after she revealed that she missed the jelly that her mom used to make for her using the crabapple trees in their yard. My crabapples were in my yard of Greater Somerville, and the jelly was so amazing that I decided to make syrup! Yes, crabapples are edible but they are not so tasty without adulteration due to their tartness and tannins, but with sugar added, they are delightful! Crabapples were historically used as pollinators for apple tree orchards mixed between the rows before moving on to be more ornamental yard plantings due to their great floral display.
Crabapple Fight!
• 1 3/4 oz Blended Scotch
• 1/4 oz Benedictine
• 1/2 oz Crabapple Syrup (*)
• 1/2 oz Lemon Juice
Shake with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, and garnish with a lemon twist (a floated lemon twist flower)
(*) Crabapple Syrup (recipe makes a little over 24 oz/3 cup)
• 4 cup sliced crabapples (remove stem & cut off the blossom end)
• 2 cup sugar
• 2 cup water
• 1/2 tsp salt
Wash crabapples, remove stems, cut off the blossom end, and slice thinly. Leave in the skins and seeds and place them in a pot. Coat with sugar, mix well, and leave for an hour our more to extract. Add water, bring to a boil, cover, and let simmer for 30 minutes. Let cool or leave overnight to steep further. Strain through a tea towel or cheese cloth. The more gentle you are with the crabapples, the clearer the syrup. The more you mash them, the cloudier the syrup will be but perhaps more flavor will be extracted. Here, I was gentle except for a final squeeze through the tea towel which donated a hint of haziness to the syrup. Bottle and refrigerate. Adding 2 oz 80 proof vodka will help to stabilize the syrup (I did not add here in case I need to use it to make mocktails).
Photo taken at the Cocktail Lab 11/09/17

fascinator

1/2 jigger Gin (2 oz Damrak)
1/4 jigger Dry Vermouth (1 oz Noilly Prat)
2 dash Absinthe (1 bsp Pernod Absinthe)
1 sprig Mint

Shake with ice (lightly muddle mint in mixing glass with ingredients and stir with ice) and strain into a cocktail glass. I added a floated mint leaf as garnish.
Two Saturdays ago, I reached for Boothby's 1934 World Drinks and How to Mix Them and found the Fascinator. The recipe reminded me of the Cooperstown, but instead of being a Perfect Martini with mint, the Fascinator was a Dry Martini with absinthe and mint. In the glass, the Fascinator gave forth an herbal-driven anise and mint bouquet to the nose. Next, a clean, crisp, dry white wine sip with hints of vegetal greenness led into a swallow showcasing the gin botanicals and the mint blending into the absinthe's anise on the finish.

Friday, October 27, 2017

andy shandy

1 oz Gin (Hayman's Royal Dock)
1/2 oz Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Simple Syrup
1 Egg White

Shake once without and once with ice, strain into a Fizz glass (with 2 oz Two Roads Ok2berfest beer), and top with amber ale (1/2 oz more). I added a lemon twist as garnish.

Two Fridays ago, I opened up A Spot at the Bar and happened upon the Andy Shandy in the beer section of the book. The recipe was crafted by Alastair Walker at the Everleigh in Melbourne, and it reminded me of a Skip & Go Naked with egg white in the mix. I learned about that classic when I crafted a beer-for-Champagne French 75 that I dubbed the Dutch 75; I called it that for I used left over Heineken Light for the impoverished-thinking Mixology Monday 36 "Hard Drinks for Hard Times," and Dagreb alerted me to the similarity. Instead of the lager in the Skip & Go Naked, Walker called for an amber ale, and I answered that request with a local amber Oktoberfest-style beer.
The Andy Shandy gave forth a lemon and floral aroma. Next, a creamy sip shared lemon and malt notes, and the swallow presented juniper blending into hops and a sour grain note from the beer.

Thursday, October 26, 2017

uncle negroni

2/3 oz Elijah Craig 12 Year Bourbon (3/4 oz Old Weller Antique 107)
1 oz Carpano Antica (Cocchi Sweet Vermouth)
3/4 oz Campari
1/2 oz Cynar
2 dash Molé Bitters (Bittermens)

Build in a double old fashioned glass, add ice, stir, and garnish with a dried orange slice (orange twist).
Two Thursdays ago, I ventured into Gary Regan's The Negroni book to see if there were any passed over recipes worth trying. The one that called out to me was the Uncle Negroni crafted by Michele Fiordoliva at Munich's Negroni Bar as her interpretation of what sort of Negroni an American might want. Utilizing Bourbon as an all-American spirit, the recipe seemed like an intriguing Boulevardier or Left Hand variation that reminded me of Backbar's Left Hand of Darkness. In the glass, the Uncle Negroni gave forth orange oil over some dark notes to the nose. Next, grape and malt on the sip led into whiskey and a mellow and rounded bitter flavor from the earthy Cynar balancing the sharper Campari on the swallow all followed by a chocolate finish.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

the modern prometheus

1 1/2 oz Hayman's Royal Dock Navy Strength Gin
1 1/2 oz Diep 9 Genever (Rutte Old Simon Genever)
1 oz Plymouth Sloe Gin (Atxa Patxaran)
1/2 oz Velvet Falernum
1/2 oz Simple Syrup
3/4 oz Grapefruit Juice
3/4 oz Lime Juice
2 dash Absinthe (1/8 oz Pernod Absinthe)
1 dash Cinnamon Bitters (1 dash Angostura Bitters + 1 dash Fee's Whiskey Barrel Bitters (instead of cinnamon-steeped Angostura))

Shake with ice, strain into a Zombie glass (Tiki mug), fill with crushed ice, and garnish with a mint sprig.
Two Wednesdays ago, I decided to make another Tiki number that I had spotted in Punch the same time that I had spotted the Dry Tongue Therapy. This one was the Modern Prometheus by Martin Cate at San Francisco's Whitechapel. Here, he took the classic Zombie and replaced the three rums with three types of gin: Genever, dry, and sloe. Once prepared and garnished, the Modern Prometheus gave forth a mint aroma that preceded a grapefruit, lime, and berry sip. And the swallow rounded things off with malty gin flavors with an anise finish from the absinthe.

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

church key

1 1/2 oz Bols Genever
1/2 oz Rothman & Winter Pear Liqueur
1/2 oz Simple Syrup
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
1 bsp Allspice Dram (1/8 oz St. Elizabeth)

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail coupe.
Two Tuesdays ago, I was browsing the Barnotes app when I spotted the Church Key that Billy Helmkamp created for the 2009 menu at Chicago's Whistler. Since I enjoyed the combination of Genever and pear in the Smokey the Pear as well as Helmkamp's Free Rider, I decided to give this one a go. Once served, the Church Key offered a malt and pear aroma. Next, the Genever's malt joined lemon and orchard fruit notes on the sip, and the swallow gave forth Genever's bitter herbal elements in addition to pear and allspice flavors.

Monday, October 23, 2017

hike in the dessert

2 oz Blanco Tequila (Cimarron)
1 oz Lime Juice
3/4 oz Agave Syrup (2:1)
4 leaf Sage (and a 5th one for garnish)

Muddle sage leaves (I did this in the agave syrup). Add the rest of the ingredients, shake with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe rinsed with Laphroaig Scotch, and garnish with a fresh sage leaf.

For the cocktail hour two Mondays ago, I turned to the Brooklyn Bartender book and found the Hike in the Desert that reminded me a little of the Oaxacan Smash. The Hike in the Desert was crafted by David Sheridan of Brooklyn's Wheated from a description of a drink with sage and Laphroaig Scotch; while he could not work out the drink with the single malt as the base, he was able to concoct this recipe using it as an accent.
In the glass, the Hike in the Desert presented peaty smoke joined by sage spice. Next, lime on the sip gave way to tequila and sage on the swallow with a tart lime finish.

skipaway

1 1/2 oz Gordon's Gin
3/4 oz Grapefruit Juice
1/4 oz Simple Syrup
2 dash Peychaud's Bitters

Shake with ice, strain into a Highball glass with 3 oz soda water, and top with ice. Garnish with a lime wedge and add straws.
After Brick & Mortar, I took Pegu Doug across Mass Ave and one street over to Green Street to give him an idea of what Boston cocktail was like a decade or more ago via this Cambridge cocktail mecca. The other connection is that Green Street is where I met Misty Kalkofen back in 2007, and after her stint at Drink, she returned back to Cambridge to open Brick & Mortar where we had just been. For a drink, I opted for the Skipaway -- a drink that I not only have not had before but one that I have not spotted in any drink book or web search to date. This grapefruit and Peychaud's Bitters for lemon Tom Collins began with a lime aroma from the garnish. Next, a carbonated grapefruit sip led into gin's juniper and other botanicals on the swallow with an anise and grapefruit finish.

Sunday, October 22, 2017

disco nap

1 1/2 oz Sombra Mezcal
3/4 oz Cucumber Syrup (1:1)
1/2 oz Yellow Chartreuse
1/2 oz Lime Juice

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail coupe.

Two Sundays ago, I met up with Doug from the Ohio-based Pegu Blog to give him another glimpse into the Boston bar scene. For a first stop, we convened at Brick & Mortar. From their disco-themed menu, I went with the Disco Nap for the combination of Chartreuse and cucumber reminded me of the Irma La Douce. The more I thought about it, the Irma was a Green Chartreuse cocktail and the closer concept was the Going Back to Mezcali that paired Yellow Chartreuse with cucumber.
The Disco Nap proffered a soothing cucumber nose with a hint of smoke. Next, lime, honey, and green vegetal notes on the sip were followed by smoky agave and cucumber flavors on the swallow. Overall, the drink teetered on a bit too sweet for my palate and perhaps knocking the cucumber syrup down a quarter ounce or the lime juice up a quarter ounce would help bring this drink into alignment for me.

Saturday, October 21, 2017

dry tongue therapy

6 dash Angostura Bitters
4 dash Absinthe (1/8 oz St. George)
1/2 oz Cinnamon Syrup
1/2 oz Falernum (Velvet)
3/4 oz Lime Juice
3/4 oz Grapefruit Juice
3/4 oz Pedro Ximenez Sherry (Lustau)
3/4 oz Gin (Damrak)
1 oz Wray & Nephew Overproof White Rum

Whip shake with pebble ice and pour into a tulip glass (shake with ice, strain into a Tiki mug, and fill with crushed ice). Garnish with a half grapefruit wheel, mint, and a smoldering cinnamon stick.
Two Saturdays ago, I was in a Tiki mood, so I decided to make one of the drinks that I had spotted on Punch called the Dry Tongue Therapy. The recipe was crafted by Guillermo Bravo of Brooklyn's Featherweight, and the combination reminded me of a Jet Pilot with gin and sweet raisiny sherry in place of two of the rums. Once prepared, the aroma was mostly the acrid scent of cinnamon smoke over more soothing mint and grapefruit elements. Next, grape from the sherry joined grapefruit notes on the sip, and funky rum, raisin, cinnamon, clove, and anise flavors on the swallow closed out the drink.

Friday, October 20, 2017

yucatan bird

1 oz Mezcal (Fidencio Espadin Joven)
1 oz Black Strap (or dark) Rum (Cruzan Black Strap)
1 1/2 oz Pineapple Juice
1/2 oz Crème de Cacao (Tempus Fugit)
1/2 oz Campari
1/2 oz Lime Juice

Shake with ice, strain into a Tiki mug, fill with crushed ice, and garnish with a mint sprig; a pineapple wedge or leaves would make for a great garnish as well.

Two Fridays ago, I was thinking about how well Campari and crème de cacao work together such as in the Stagecoach Mary and Mon Sherry Amour as well as what a great duo mezcal and cacao are such as in the Ask the Dust and Guelaguetza. My mind wandered over to the Campari-Tiki drink the Jungle Bird, and I wondered if I could split the spirit to dark or black strap rum and mezcal and split the liqueurs to Campari and cacao (or better stated switch the simple syrup to cacao)? I do know that mezcal works as a base spirit substitution in a Jungle Bird after having one made for me at Drink two years ago. For a name, I opted for the Yucatan Bird after the part of Mexico that contains rain forests, a good number of jungle birds, and much of Mexico's chocolate production.
The Yucatan Bird greeted the nose with mint aromas over chocolate and smoke nose. Next, pineapple, lime, and molasses on the sip were joined by smoky agave as well as molasses' and Campari's bitterness melding into chocolate on the swallow with a lingering smoke finish.

Thursday, October 19, 2017

first of four

1 1/2 oz Prairie Gin (Damrak)
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Avèze Gentian Liqueur (Salers)
1/4 oz Crème de Violette (Rothman & Winters)
1/4 oz Honey Syrup

Shake with ice, strain into a cocktail glass, garnish with a cucumber slice (lemon twist).

On Thursday two weeks ago, I remembered the Punch Drinks article on how to use Avèze in cocktails. As I reread the text, the recipe that I decided to make with Luke DeYoung's First of Four that he crafted at Chicago's Scofflaw. I was curious to see if Salers would work just as well in DeYoung's riff on an Aviation as it did in the Of Lambs and Lions.
The First of Four greeted the nose with a lemon bouquet with a hint of gentian; had I used the cucumber garnish, it probably would have brought out and complemented the gentian notes more than the lemon twist. Next, lemon on the sip transitioned into gin, earthy-herbal, and floral flavors on the swallow.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

hinky dinks fizzy

2 oz Sparkling Wine (Willm Blanc de Blancs)
1 1/2 oz Pineapple Juice
1/2 oz Lime Juice
1/2 oz Passion Fruit Syrup
1/2 oz Apricot Liqueur (Rothman & Winter)
1 oz London Dry Gin (Beefeater)
1 oz Blended Lightly Aged Rum (Plantation 3 Star)

Blend all but the sparkling wine with 12 oz crushed ice and 4-6 small ice cubes, and pour with a gated strain into a 22 oz snifter with the sparkling wine (shake with ice, strain into a 16 oz snifter with sparkling wine, and fill with crushed ice). Garnish with a mint sprig (mint and a nasturtium).
Two Wednesdays ago, I was in a Tiki mood so I reached for the Smuggler's Cove book and found the Hinky Dinks Fizzy. The drink was created by Trader Vic's in 1984 for their 50th anniversary, and it reminded me of their 1950s era Rum Keg punch with a few changes including splitting the rum with gin, switching lemon to lime, and lightening the body with sparkling wine. The name itself pays tribute to the original name of the first Trader Vic's, Hinky Dink's. Once prepared, the Hinky Dinks Fizzy gave forth a mint and floral aroma that led into a carbonated lime and tropical passion fruit sip. Next, the gin's botanicals joined pineapple, white wine, and apricot flavors on the swallow.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

amaro sour

1 1/2 oz Amaro (Ramazzotti)
3/4 oz Bourbon (Fighting Cock 103)
1 oz Lemon Juice
1/4 oz Simple Syrup
1 Egg White

Shake once without ice and once with ice, strain into a rocks glass with ice or into a coupe without ice (rocks glass with ice), and garnish with a lemon-cherry flag.

Two Tuesdays ago, Andrea was in the mood for a digestif so I grabbed Brad Parson's Amaro. Out of the list of drinks I still want to make from that book, I was lured in by Brad's Amaro Sour that was based off of Jeffrey Morgenthaler's The Best Amaretto Sour in the World recipe. Brad swapped the amaretto for a dealer's choice pick of an amaro akin to Katie Emmerson and my Kitty Leroy Fix, and I opted for Ramazzotti which often gets overlooked on the amaro shelf despite being both affordable and flavorful.
The Amaro Sour when made with Ramazzotti began with a lemon and root beer aroma. Next, sweet caramel from the amaro was balanced by the lemon's crispness on the creamy sip, and the swallow offered root beer, licorice, and orange flavors that were well supported by the Bourbon backbone.

Monday, October 16, 2017

evening redness no. 1

2 oz Beefeater Gin
1 oz Carpano Antica (Cocchi Sweet Vermouth)
1/4 oz Campari
1/4 oz Angostura Bitters
1 tsp Sugar Cane Syrup (JM Sirop de Canne)

Shake with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, and garnish with a grapefruit (orange) twist.

Two Mondays ago, I was captivated by a recipe by Nicholas Jarrett called the Evening Redness No. 1 that I spotted on the Barnotes app. Jarrett crafted this number at Philadelphia's Franklin Mortgage and Investment Co. back in 2009, and the drink reminded me of a embittered Martinez crossed with a hint of Negroni. As a side note, the Evening Redness No. 2 varied by calling for Junipero instead of Beefeater Gin as well as Amaro Nonino instead of Campari; since I lack Amaro Nonino at home, it was an easy choice to make. I trusted Jarrett's call to shake this straight spirits drink and figured that it would yield a frothiness from the Angostura Bitters.
In the glass, the Evening Redness No. 1 shared an orange and juniper nose that preceded a rich off-dry grape sip. Next gin, clove, cinnamon, and orange flavors on the swallow rounded out the drink.

Sunday, October 15, 2017

autumn daiquiri

2 oz Mount Gay Eclipse Rum (Plantation Barbados 5 Year)
1/2 oz Lime Juice
1/2 oz Pineapple Juice
1/4 oz Cinnamon Syrup
1/4 oz Demerara Syrup
1 dash Angostura Bitters

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail coupe.
Two Sundays ago for the cocktail hour, I reached for the Death & Co. Cocktail Book. My search ended up in the Daiquiri variation section where I was drawn to Joaquin Simo's 2008 Autumn Daiquiri. The name reminded me of the Winter Daiquiri which used vanilla and allspice dram instead of the Autumn Daiquiri's cinnamon syrup and pineapple juice. In the glass, the Autumn Daiquiri presented the aged rum's caramel along with the syrup and bitters' cinnamon on the nose. Next, lime, caramel, and hints of pineapple on the sip led into rum, vanilla, cinnamon, and clove on the swallow.

Saturday, October 14, 2017

southern

1 jigger Whisky (1 1/2 oz Rittenhouse Rye)
1 dash Grenadine (1/2 oz)
1 dash Benedictine (1/2 oz)
1 dash Lemon Juice (3/4 oz)

Stir with a lump of ice, add a cherry, twist a lemon peel over it, and serve with a spoon (shake with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, and garnish with a lemon twist).

Two Saturdays ago while cooking dinner, I began perusing the pages of Boothby's 1934 World Drinks & How to Mix Them when I spotted the Southern. The drink reminded me of a Frisco Sour with grenadine as well as my Frisco Sour-Jack Rose mashup, the Frisco Rose without the apple brandy and Peychaud's Bitters. For the spirit, the book referred to whiskey as "whisky" perhaps as a throwback to Prohibition when most of the whisk(e)y was either Canadian or Scottish, and I opted for an American rye whiskey here. And for the proportions and style, I crafted this more like a Sour than a built drink.
The Southern gave forth a lemon, whiskey, and hint of pomegranate bouquet to the nose. Next, lemon and berry on the sip led into rye and herbal notes on the swallow with tart lemon and pomegranate on the finish.

Friday, October 13, 2017

stigmata

1 1/2 oz Cognac (Camus VS)
1 oz Dolin Blanc Vermouth
1/2 oz Nardini Amaro

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail coupe, and garnish with a floated mint leaf.
After enjoying the Great Satan, I decided to make another recipe by Philadelphia bartender Paul MacDonald. The drink I made two Fridays ago was another straight-spirits Negroni-esque number that I spotted in the OnTheBar site called the Stigmata. Once prepared, the Stigmata gave forth mint aromas over dark notes from the aged brandy and the amaro's caramel. Next, caramel paired with sweet white grape on the sip, and the swallow supplemented the Cognac notes with herbal, chocolate, and mint elements from the vermouth and Nardini Amaro. Indeed, the mint garnish prepared the palate some of the amaro's botanical flavors on the finish.

Thursday, October 12, 2017

commando bird

1/2 oz Lime Juice
1 1/2 oz Pineapple Juice
1/2 oz Passion Fruit Syrup
1/2 oz Campari
1 1/2 oz Doctor Bird or Plantation Original Dark Rum (Plantation Dark)

Shake with crushed ice and pour into a glass (shake with ice, strain into a Tiki mug, and fill with crushed ice). I garnished with nasturtium flowers and added a straw.

Two Thursdays ago, I decided to make a drink that I had spotted on El_Nova_1's Instagram called the Commando Bird. The drink is a Jungle Bird riff crafted by Jason Alexander (a/k/a the Tiki Commando) of the Tacoma Cabana and Rum Bar. Here, the main variance from the late 1970s classic is that the simple syrup was switched to passion fruit syrup. Given how well Campari and passion fruit pair such as in the Novara, I was definitely intrigued. Moreover, the drink reminded me of the Urban Bird that I collaborated on for a drink of the day that swapped the classic's pineapple juice and simple syrup for orange juice and passion fruit syrup, and also the Aperol and gin 'I'iwi Bird came to mind.
In the mug, the Commando Bird donated a peppery floral aroma from my choice of nasturtium blossom garnish. Next, lime, pineapple, and a tropical note from the passion fruit filled the sip, and the swallow showcased the dark rum and the Campari-passion fruit bitter tropical flavors.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

hercules

2 oz Lustau Amontillado Sherry
1/2 oz Campari
1/2 oz Passion Fruit Syrup
1/2 oz Orgeat
1/2 oz Lemon Juice
2 dash Bittermens Molé Bitters

Shake with ice, strain into a double old fashioned glass, fill with crushed ice, garnish with mint sprigs, and add a straw.

Two Wednesdays ago, I decided to remake my submission to the 2017 Lustau Solera Stand Out competition. I was inspired by my Negroni Week offering that melded the classic Negroni with the 1960s Tiki drink the Saturn that I called the Negroni on Saturn. In remembering how well Amontillado and Oloroso sherry go well with nutty orgeat and tropical passion fruit, I rearranged the drink to make a sherry-driven Tiki drink with sherry subbing in for gin and sweet vermouth in my mashup and with molé bitters taking the place of the falernum as the spice element. For a name, I kept the god theme of the Saturn and went with a related one, Hercules, who was allegedly buried in Cadiz, Spain, the center of sherry production.
The Hercules began with a mint aroma that led into a creamy grape sip with hints of lemon. Next, the swallow was nutty from the sherry and orgeat with passion fruit softening Campari's bitterness, and it ended with a chocolate and passion fruit finish.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

aku aku

Juice 1 Lime (1 oz)
8-10 leaf Mint (10 leaves)
1 dash Rock Candy Syrup (1/2 oz Simple)
1/2 slice Pineapple (1 oz Pineapple Juice)
1/2 oz Peach Liqueur (Briottet Crème de Pêche de Vigne)
1 oz Light Puerto Rican Rum (Angostura White Oak)

Blend with ice (~8 oz) and pour into a large cocktail glass (water goblet). I garnished with a mint sprig and a nasturtium blossom.
Two Tuesdays ago, I reached for Trader Vic's 1972 edition of his Bartender's Guide where I spotted one of his originals, the Aku Aku. The recipe appeared to be his take on Don the Beachcomber's circa 1940 Missionary's Downfall with rock candy syrup instead of honey. Once prepared, the Aku Aku gave forth a glorious mint aroma. Next lime and pineapple mingled on the sip, and the swallow offered complementary rum, peach, and mint flavors.

Monday, October 9, 2017

part-time lover

1 1/2 oz Blanco Tequila (Cimarron)
1/2 oz Aperol
1/2 oz Elderflower Liqueur (St. Elder)
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
2 dash Angostura Bitters

Shake with ice, strain into a rocks glass with ice (coupe glass sans ice), and garnish with a grapefruit (orange) twist.

Two Mondays ago for the cocktail hour, I turned to Imbibe Magazine online where I had bookmarked the Part-Time Lover created by Jon Weimorts at Los Angeles' Idle Hour. Indeed, the combination of Aperol, elderflower, and lemon reminded me of Paul Clarke's Dunniette and Josh Childs' Shaddock. Here, the spirit was tequila with an added spiced complexity from Angostura Bitters.
While the recipe prescribed an on-the-rocks presentation, I was more in the mood for an up drink and served it as such; I was also out of grapefruit, so I switched the twist identity to orange. With this change in garnish, the orange oil brought out the Aperol aroma on the nose. Next, lemon juice and Aperol's orange combined to generate an almost tangerine flavor, and the swallow gave forth tequila, rhubarb, and elderflower flavors with clove-driven bitters on the finish.

Sunday, October 8, 2017

mambo #5

1 1/2 oz Reposado Tequila (Lunazul)
3/4 oz Lime Juice
1/2 oz Kronan Swedish Punsch
1/2 oz Orgeat
1/4 oz Campari

Shake with ice, strain into a double old fashioned glass with crushed ice, and garnish with a mint sprig and orange peel.

Two Sundays ago, I was looking through the OnTheBar drink directory when I spotted the Mambo #5 by Ian Kearney of Manhattan's The Daisy. The combination of tequila, Campari, and orgeat reminded me of Death in the Garden, and the Swedish punsch element seemed like it would complement the tequila and Campari as described in my Swedish punsch cheat sheet. So overall, I was definitely looking forward to trying this combination.
Once prepared, the Mambo #5 offered an orange and mint bouquet to the nose. Next, a creamy lime sip led into swallow which saw tequila's herbal flavors melding into the punsch's tea notes as well as the nutty orgeat working well with the Campari's bitter orange. Overall, the combination reminded me of the tequila Mai Tai called the Pinky Gonzalez with a touch of the Bitter Mai Tai thrown in too.